22nd July 2014
apostlemage:

pyramidslayer:

look what you can buy

There is a Pope in the Cars universe. This means that there is Catholic Christianity, which means there was a Jesus car who was crucified. Jesus Chrysler was crucified by car Romans under Pontiac Pilot who washed his wheels. A car was nailed to a cross and ascended to Heaven.

apostlemage:

pyramidslayer:

look what you can buy

There is a Pope in the Cars universe. This means that there is Catholic Christianity, which means there was a Jesus car who was crucified. Jesus Chrysler was crucified by car Romans under Pontiac Pilot who washed his wheels. A car was nailed to a cross and ascended to Heaven.

Reblogged from : potato-vagina
21st July 2014
If you can approach the world’s complexities, both its glories and its horrors, with an attitude of humble curiosity, acknowledging that however deeply you have seen, you have only scratched the surface, you will find worlds within worlds, beauties you could not heretofore imagine, and your own mundane preoccupations will shrink to proper size, not all that important in the greater scheme of things.

— Daniel C. Dennett (via observando)

Reblogged from : wordsofhersong
21st July 2014
17000dollars:

mmkayn:

vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.
There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.
It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 

this continues to be the best reply to a criticizing comment on this site

i only have like 5 bookmarks but for some reason this was one of them

17000dollars:

mmkayn:

vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.

There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.

It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 

this continues to be the best reply to a criticizing comment on this site

i only have like 5 bookmarks but for some reason this was one of them

(Source: vastderp-placeholder)

Reblogged from : caelyngraves
21st July 2014
iamthorodinson:

awaiting-my-escape:

cultureshift:

ceevee5:

blvcknvy:

Licia Ronzulli, member of the European Parliament, has been taking her daughter Vittoria to the Parliament sessions for two years now.

Every time this is on my dash, it’s an automatic reblog.

Life. There’s always a way to make it work.

This woman runs PARLIAMENT with a baby in her lap and she’s CLEARLY doing an outstanding job because she’s still there being a total boss two years later, baby still in her lap.
"A baby will destroy your career-"
Really
Are you sure?
Because I’m pretty sure that Licia Ronzulli would laugh at that declaration.


that kids got one hell of a messy bun going iamthorodinson:

awaiting-my-escape:

cultureshift:

ceevee5:

blvcknvy:

Licia Ronzulli, member of the European Parliament, has been taking her daughter Vittoria to the Parliament sessions for two years now.

Every time this is on my dash, it’s an automatic reblog.

Life. There’s always a way to make it work.

This woman runs PARLIAMENT with a baby in her lap and she’s CLEARLY doing an outstanding job because she’s still there being a total boss two years later, baby still in her lap.
"A baby will destroy your career-"
Really
Are you sure?
Because I’m pretty sure that Licia Ronzulli would laugh at that declaration.


that kids got one hell of a messy bun going iamthorodinson:

awaiting-my-escape:

cultureshift:

ceevee5:

blvcknvy:

Licia Ronzulli, member of the European Parliament, has been taking her daughter Vittoria to the Parliament sessions for two years now.

Every time this is on my dash, it’s an automatic reblog.

Life. There’s always a way to make it work.

This woman runs PARLIAMENT with a baby in her lap and she’s CLEARLY doing an outstanding job because she’s still there being a total boss two years later, baby still in her lap.
"A baby will destroy your career-"
Really
Are you sure?
Because I’m pretty sure that Licia Ronzulli would laugh at that declaration.


that kids got one hell of a messy bun going iamthorodinson:

awaiting-my-escape:

cultureshift:

ceevee5:

blvcknvy:

Licia Ronzulli, member of the European Parliament, has been taking her daughter Vittoria to the Parliament sessions for two years now.

Every time this is on my dash, it’s an automatic reblog.

Life. There’s always a way to make it work.

This woman runs PARLIAMENT with a baby in her lap and she’s CLEARLY doing an outstanding job because she’s still there being a total boss two years later, baby still in her lap.
"A baby will destroy your career-"
Really
Are you sure?
Because I’m pretty sure that Licia Ronzulli would laugh at that declaration.


that kids got one hell of a messy bun going iamthorodinson:

awaiting-my-escape:

cultureshift:

ceevee5:

blvcknvy:

Licia Ronzulli, member of the European Parliament, has been taking her daughter Vittoria to the Parliament sessions for two years now.

Every time this is on my dash, it’s an automatic reblog.

Life. There’s always a way to make it work.

This woman runs PARLIAMENT with a baby in her lap and she’s CLEARLY doing an outstanding job because she’s still there being a total boss two years later, baby still in her lap.
"A baby will destroy your career-"
Really
Are you sure?
Because I’m pretty sure that Licia Ronzulli would laugh at that declaration.


that kids got one hell of a messy bun going iamthorodinson:

awaiting-my-escape:

cultureshift:

ceevee5:

blvcknvy:

Licia Ronzulli, member of the European Parliament, has been taking her daughter Vittoria to the Parliament sessions for two years now.

Every time this is on my dash, it’s an automatic reblog.

Life. There’s always a way to make it work.

This woman runs PARLIAMENT with a baby in her lap and she’s CLEARLY doing an outstanding job because she’s still there being a total boss two years later, baby still in her lap.
"A baby will destroy your career-"
Really
Are you sure?
Because I’m pretty sure that Licia Ronzulli would laugh at that declaration.


that kids got one hell of a messy bun going iamthorodinson:

awaiting-my-escape:

cultureshift:

ceevee5:

blvcknvy:

Licia Ronzulli, member of the European Parliament, has been taking her daughter Vittoria to the Parliament sessions for two years now.

Every time this is on my dash, it’s an automatic reblog.

Life. There’s always a way to make it work.

This woman runs PARLIAMENT with a baby in her lap and she’s CLEARLY doing an outstanding job because she’s still there being a total boss two years later, baby still in her lap.
"A baby will destroy your career-"
Really
Are you sure?
Because I’m pretty sure that Licia Ronzulli would laugh at that declaration.


that kids got one hell of a messy bun going

iamthorodinson:

awaiting-my-escape:

cultureshift:

ceevee5:

blvcknvy:

Licia Ronzulli, member of the European Parliament, has been taking her daughter Vittoria to the Parliament sessions for two years now.

Every time this is on my dash, it’s an automatic reblog.

Life. There’s always a way to make it work.

This woman runs PARLIAMENT with a baby in her lap and she’s CLEARLY doing an outstanding job because she’s still there being a total boss two years later, baby still in her lap.

"A baby will destroy your career-"

Really

Are you sure?

Because I’m pretty sure that Licia Ronzulli would laugh at that declaration.

that kids got one hell of a messy bun going

Reblogged from : caelyngraves
21st July 2014
may10baby:

robotsandfrippary:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

It’s a tradition in korea as well.  In korean the women are called Haenyo and the structure of their society is/was matriarchal.  I’ve also heard them called “dragon women”.


Not to mention a lot of modern haenyo are old women in their forties, fifties and sixties. Imagine your grandma making a living diving for clams and abalone while grandpa babysat and did the grocery shopping may10baby:

robotsandfrippary:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

It’s a tradition in korea as well.  In korean the women are called Haenyo and the structure of their society is/was matriarchal.  I’ve also heard them called “dragon women”.


Not to mention a lot of modern haenyo are old women in their forties, fifties and sixties. Imagine your grandma making a living diving for clams and abalone while grandpa babysat and did the grocery shopping may10baby:

robotsandfrippary:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

It’s a tradition in korea as well.  In korean the women are called Haenyo and the structure of their society is/was matriarchal.  I’ve also heard them called “dragon women”.


Not to mention a lot of modern haenyo are old women in their forties, fifties and sixties. Imagine your grandma making a living diving for clams and abalone while grandpa babysat and did the grocery shopping may10baby:

robotsandfrippary:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

It’s a tradition in korea as well.  In korean the women are called Haenyo and the structure of their society is/was matriarchal.  I’ve also heard them called “dragon women”.


Not to mention a lot of modern haenyo are old women in their forties, fifties and sixties. Imagine your grandma making a living diving for clams and abalone while grandpa babysat and did the grocery shopping may10baby:

robotsandfrippary:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

It’s a tradition in korea as well.  In korean the women are called Haenyo and the structure of their society is/was matriarchal.  I’ve also heard them called “dragon women”.


Not to mention a lot of modern haenyo are old women in their forties, fifties and sixties. Imagine your grandma making a living diving for clams and abalone while grandpa babysat and did the grocery shopping may10baby:

robotsandfrippary:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

It’s a tradition in korea as well.  In korean the women are called Haenyo and the structure of their society is/was matriarchal.  I’ve also heard them called “dragon women”.


Not to mention a lot of modern haenyo are old women in their forties, fifties and sixties. Imagine your grandma making a living diving for clams and abalone while grandpa babysat and did the grocery shopping may10baby:

robotsandfrippary:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

It’s a tradition in korea as well.  In korean the women are called Haenyo and the structure of their society is/was matriarchal.  I’ve also heard them called “dragon women”.


Not to mention a lot of modern haenyo are old women in their forties, fifties and sixties. Imagine your grandma making a living diving for clams and abalone while grandpa babysat and did the grocery shopping may10baby:

robotsandfrippary:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

It’s a tradition in korea as well.  In korean the women are called Haenyo and the structure of their society is/was matriarchal.  I’ve also heard them called “dragon women”.


Not to mention a lot of modern haenyo are old women in their forties, fifties and sixties. Imagine your grandma making a living diving for clams and abalone while grandpa babysat and did the grocery shopping may10baby:

robotsandfrippary:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

It’s a tradition in korea as well.  In korean the women are called Haenyo and the structure of their society is/was matriarchal.  I’ve also heard them called “dragon women”.


Not to mention a lot of modern haenyo are old women in their forties, fifties and sixties. Imagine your grandma making a living diving for clams and abalone while grandpa babysat and did the grocery shopping may10baby:

robotsandfrippary:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

It’s a tradition in korea as well.  In korean the women are called Haenyo and the structure of their society is/was matriarchal.  I’ve also heard them called “dragon women”.


Not to mention a lot of modern haenyo are old women in their forties, fifties and sixties. Imagine your grandma making a living diving for clams and abalone while grandpa babysat and did the grocery shopping

may10baby:

robotsandfrippary:

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 

For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.

In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

It’s a tradition in korea as well.  In korean the women are called Haenyo and the structure of their society is/was matriarchal.  I’ve also heard them called “dragon women”.

Not to mention a lot of modern haenyo are old women in their forties, fifties and sixties. Imagine your grandma making a living diving for clams and abalone while grandpa babysat and did the grocery shopping

Reblogged from : may10baby

Life is coming at me way too fast and I'm scared. I find quotes that speak to me and I latch on to them. One day I will find a calmer swell in this ocean of life...

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